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> Making A Flange 0.0.3
johansen
Posted: January 31, 2012 11:25 am
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user posted image
user posted image
made some progress today.

I have since modified the die to reflect the diagram, adding support under the outer edge, where the red origin is on the diagram, as well as un warping it blink.gif
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It refuses to bend nicely, instead it is twisted 15 degrees or so. however most of the warpage you see is actually left over from a previous die i made having underestimated the force required to bend it and it didn't provide enough support. (probably in the neighborhood of 15-25 tons to make a 12 inch radius in a 6 inch long section of metal. .)
I'm reasonably confident that this current die will work. thing is, due to the warpage you can't just pull it out of the die, so i may have to push it through the die with a sledge hammer.

so to solve the problem of the angle iron twisting 15 degrees or so i came up with this idea.
user posted image

the problem with that being that it would be difficult to press, because the force needs to be applied at a 30-45 degree angle from the direction of movement. In theory keep it square.

Another option is forming it into a circle as is, drill the bolt holes, bolt them together then just make another die to press the two flanges together.

a third option would be tack welding both pieces of angle iron together every inch and pressing both into a circle at the same time, however that would require a 50 ton press.


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Jawno
Posted: January 31, 2012 04:23 pm
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Not sure what it is your trying to accomplish here. Maybe you could explain the goal a little clearer and perhaps we could offer some ideas. Or am I missing something here. Seems like I've only gotten the last part of the story. Whats the goal? To curve an angle iron piece. Sounds hard. Whazts it for? So many questions, would like to offer an answer but not sure how.
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AwesomeMatt
Posted: January 31, 2012 08:40 pm
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QUOTE
Or am I missing something here. Seems like I've only gotten the last part of the story.
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johansen
Posted: January 31, 2012 09:50 pm
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ah yes, the goal is to make a 24 inch diameter flange smile.gif

this time around I should be able to get the holes lined up to within .005" -meaning if you rotate the flange 90 degrees, the holes still line up.


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tekwiz
Posted: January 31, 2012 10:31 pm
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1) Add at least 3 thick gussets per side to the outer vertical sections in the lower die. If you were to measure, you'll find that those deflect signifigantly under pressure & this will add to the warping of the workpiece.
2) To prevent the upper die from warping, you'll need to reinforce the horizontal surface with a piece of solid bar of equal width, or heavy wall square tubing. Either must be continuously welded on both sides, or stitch welded with >50% coverage. Watch out for warping of the lower die base too, if it's under 1" thick. You can't expect a perfect workpiece if your die doesn't maintain it's shape under the necessary forming pressure.
3) Use lubricant for the forming, or heat the blank. Lube will reduce forming forces by nearly half, possibly more given the rough surfaces of thesliding die sections. Heating the blank to a bare red heat will reduce forming forces by 80-98%, depending on temperature.
Dry graphite or anti seize compound are suitable lubricants, as is an EP grease or gear lube with 25% dry clay added. An oil/white lead paste is good, but somewhat hard to find these days.
4) Most importantly, reduce the clearance between sliding vertical die sections to an absolute minimum...you get the best forming results when you leave the workpiece metal only one way to go...into a space exactly the size of the finished product. Use sheet metal shims for this, placed between sections. These need not be fastened down. This size must be maintained under pressure, & that's the difficult part. wink.gif


BTW: Do you have access to either a plasma cutter or cutting torch?


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Trouble rather the tiger in his lair, than the sage among his books.
For to you, kings & armies are things mighty & enduring.
To him, mere toys of the moment, to be overturned at the flick of a finger.

Fortuna favet fortibus.
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