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> Tricking Out My Cheap Bike, it begins...(pics)
AdamO
Posted: July 02, 2011 08:26 am
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Hey guys!

When I left for my trip to Illinois, I wanted a good touring bike to carry me there. The Trek 520 was just that and then some, and I wouldn't want to ride anything else long distance. However, it wasn't cheap. This fall, I'll need a commuter bike and I just can't risk getting the 520 stolen. So I paid a guy off Craigslist $90 for a 1985 Raleigh Mountain Tour Teton:
http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj234/A...06-21151100.jpg

It is perfect. Being a mountain bike, it has nice fat tires, a relaxed geometry, and sealed-bearing hubs. It came with the rear rack (essential for my purposes) and a seat bag (not pictured). Oh, and it's got friction shifters. Love friction shifters...

Anyway, this bike needs to be tricked out and I wanted to start with a tail light. Battery-operated is the simplest, but hardly the most fun, so I set out to conjure, from the garbage piles, a rim-driven dynamo that could provide me with a nice supply of on-board power.

I have a bunch of small DC motors in my parts bin, so I pulled one out that looked like a good size (not tiny, but not so big as to be too heavy either) and started to think how I might go about fashioning a bracket that could hold this motor onto the bike's frame. I picked up a junked HDD I had and noticed that there was actually a piece of sheet metal laminated to the outside of the enclosure. So I wedged a knife in there and peeled it off:
http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj234/A...06-30153426.jpg

Turns out, this piece of metal is thick enough to hold up, but thin enough to be easily workable. I cut a strip from it, hammered it into a bracket for the motor, and drilled holes in the ends. I cut a hole in a piece of wood and chucked it onto my dremel tool. Using the dremel as a lathe, I spun the hole and held a file to it until it got nice and rounded. This I epoxied onto the motor's axle. And here was the result:
http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj234/A...06-30182605.jpg

I used an extra bike tail reflector bracket I had laying around to mount the motor to my left chainstay. Usually dynamos are mounted to the seatstay, but my setup didn't really allow for that, as the brake bosses got in the way. I put some duct tape on the wooden spindle thinggie to give it some traction against the rim. Here she is!
http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj234/A...07-01161950.jpg

Now it's time for some testing. I wanted to see that the rim would actually drive this dynamo, mechanically. I also wanted to see what kind of voltage I'd see coming out of it. I turned the bike upside down, so that I could turn the pedal with my hands. I hooked up my voltmeter to the dynamo leads and the voltage climbed to 15-20V with minimal effort. When I spun the wheel fast, I got as much as 40V or so. Success! But how much current can this thing source? I was a little concerned about this, because I found myself unable to fry a red LED (no resistor) with pedal power. Further testing was needed. So I threw this tail light together:
http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj234/A...07-01201439.jpg

What you are looking at is a tic-tac box, zip-tied to the rack, housing a little piece of perfboard with two red LEDs soldered in place. I tacked on a 7805 just in case. Spinning the pedals again, the LEDs lit right up, nice and bright! I decided to take the Teton for a spin while it was still light. I was interested primarily in the mechanical qualities of the dynamo. Would it stay in place, pressed against the rim, during a ride? How about a ride over rocks and tree roots?

So I rode about 10 miles, a good part of which was on wooded trails. Up and down hills, over rocks and bumps, the dynamo did not lose contact with the rim. The not-so-smooth duct tape traction makes an annoying noise, but hell, I'm not complaining!

So the dynamo worked. Now I want a real tail light. I had a bunch of those high-brightness square-shaped 4-legged LEDs (red) that I had scrapped from solar garden lights and figured this was a good time to break them out. Some testing revealed that they could be driven safely and brightly from 12V in strings of 4 with 190ohm resistors, so I soldered up a piece of perfboard with two such strings. Here they are:
http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj234/A...07-02013023.jpg
http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj234/A...07-02013114.jpg

The black thing is the enclosure of a blackberry charger. I cut the rectangular shaped hole to fit the LEDs. They snap right into place in that hole.

And here's the underside. I stuck a 7812 to keep things under control:
http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj234/A...07-02013038.jpg

I later added a small aluminum heatsink, as things did warm up a bit in there. And here it is, snapped in place:
http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj234/A...07-02013318.jpg

All closed up and ready to go:
http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj234/A...07-02013417.jpg

These guys are pretty bright indeed:
http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj234/A...07-02013758.jpg

In the picture, I'm powering the tail light from a ghetto bench supply (14V unregulated) I whipped up a while back. That supply can source a decent amount of current, so I still had to make sure my dynamo was up to the task. I have yet to mount my tail light on the Teton, but I hooked it up to the dynamo and repeated the upside-down hand pedal thing and to my pleasant surprise, the tail light lit up just as brightly as it had from the bench supply. Only trouble was I had to be pedaling fast enough to get the dynamo up to at least 12V. Slow down, and the tail light peters out. My plan, therefore, is to whip out one of my 10,000uF 40V electrolytic capacitors to provide at least a few seconds worth of backup power during stops and slow-downs.

Where I Am Going Next
I recently got a smartphone. Samsung Charge. It's got a GPS and some navigation software on it. I thought it would be cool to create a handlebar-mounted cradle for it so I can use the GPS and navigation software during a ride, to find my way around new places, without having to stop and pull out a map. Problem is, the GPS really eats up power and the phone's battery won't last more than a few hours if the GPS is in constant use. So plans are in the works to run some wiring from my dynamo to the phone cradle. I've already ripped out the buck regulator from a car charger (regulates automotive 12V, or anything really, down to the 5.5V USB standard) and I will use it to turn the phone cradle into a charging dock. The cradle will also be fitted with a headlight and, possibly, a pocket radio. The only thing I need for this that I don't yet have is a female USB connector. Won't be a problem as I'll be heading to the dump this Wednesday and I am guaranteed to find piles of trashed computers there.

Also, since I don't mind a little extra weight on this bike, I have been considering the option of strapping a small 12V SLA to it somewhere and using the dynamo to keep it charged. My plan is to get all my bells and whistles built and set up first, then see if the battery will be necessary.

Oh, and I'm stealing Terror Storm's idea for a bike odometer, and I'm stealing kl27x's idea to use a calculator for the display. One thing ya can't say about this forum is that it doesn't have clever people in it!

That's it for now, but there's plenty more to come!
Adam O.
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MacFromOK
Posted: July 02, 2011 08:36 am
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QUOTE (AdamO @ July 02, 2011 02:26 am)
My plan is to get all my bells and whistles built and set up first, then see if the battery will be necessary.

If you want lights (of any kind), I'd say splurge for a battery. Otherwise, you'll have none when stopped at a traffic signal/sign. beer.gif


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CWB
Posted: July 02, 2011 10:11 am
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SLA ?
i would go with a Li type ... pound for pound more energy density .
you would need a good regulation/charging circuit ... switching type would most likely be the best .

motors as generators ...
that motor is good for experimentation but not good for the long haul .
the way to go is an alternator type (ac output , rectifiers mounted outboard) that is designed for the job . they are much beefier mechanically and electrically simpler and therefore more efficient and reliable .
(yep ... there was a reason that generators on vehicles were replaced with alternators)

a possible problem with running on the sidewall of a tire is wear .
running on the rim means that you need an elastomeric solution ... rubber for friction and low noise .
running on the face of a tire is the best way .

an adjustable spring loaded "tensioner" that can be released will allow the application of just enough force to maintain good mechanical contact (extra force means extra drag and shorter bushing life) and some "give" so that things don't snap .
many of the units i have seen have these features ... plus they can be released when not needed .


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Village Idiot
Posted: July 02, 2011 10:22 am
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Ah yes, the rim drive generator. I had one (alternator actually) on my bike when I was a kid. When you flipped it on, it suddenly required 10 times the effort to pedal. It was like suddenly going up a 45 degree incline with a 100 MPH headwind. Needless to say, efficiency wasn't spectacular. If you want to build up your leg muscles then fine, but considering that you went to all the trouble to get a decent quality bike with (hopefully) minimal friction losses, why hitch your thoroughbred to a plow?
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CWB
Posted: July 02, 2011 12:58 pm
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heh ... yeah , i had a couple of those that turned my bikes into a rotary leg presses .
laugh.gif

today there are several advantages/improvements over the old stuff :
super-suds magnets
switching regulators (as opposed to a zener shunt)
better battery chemistry(ies)
LEDS !!!

i ran a 6 volt LA battery ... something like 4AH and weighed about 1.5 pounds (and it was not sealed) .
i used a 10 watt 6.8 volt zener as a shunt regulator with two diodes in series (one to compensate for the isolation diode) .
the lamps were dummy loads as/when compared to modern leds . today , it's more light for less current .

i figured that by using a higher voltage (12 volt) i could realize a little better efficiency .
i tore an alternator apart ... no room for additional windings .
so much for that idea .


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AdamO
Posted: July 02, 2011 05:05 pm
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Mac- my thinking is to try to accomplish this with capacitors. If they can't cut it, I'll move on to batteries.

CWB- The reason for SLA is simple: I have 3 perfectly good ones sitting around. Also, I'm kinda dumb and don't know how to build a charging circuit for Li batteries. As for the alternator, I just don't have one. For now, the motor works great, and if I can find something more efficient, I'll take it. It all depends on the moods of the Garbage Gods. The duct tape for traction is also not ideal, but it was the best I had laying around. Notice a theme here? biggrin.gif

Also, I can't run against the tires because they are old and need to be replaced soon anyway and the last thing they need is a generator bothering them. The duct tape will probably eventually get replaced with Plasti-dip or silicone sealant, or something squishy and rubbery like that.

And I know about the spring tension mechanisms. For now a zip tie does the job, but I have a few ideas about how I can do it with spring tension.

VI- it is true that rim-drive generators make you have to gear down. The truth is, when I went for a ride after installing it, I barely felt it. Maybe I'm already strong from my previous trip? Heh. And I did try out some pretty unforgiving terrain. It is also true, though, that the Teton is a 15-speed mountain bike and as such has some reasonably low gearing.

Thanks for the replies!
Adam O.
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AdamO
Posted: July 03, 2011 06:10 am
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Ok, I made some ghettofab upgrades to my ghettofab tail light. This is quickly becoming a downward spiral of ugly uselessness and I'm having a blast. Cut up more scrap metal and made a ghetto-tastic bracket to hold my tail light in place. I also threw 20,000uF of capacitance in there to keep the light on while I'm stopped. The giant caps are rated for 40V and I hooked up the 7812 to the caps rather than directly to the tail light, so they should stay nicely at 12V. Here, look:
http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj234/A...07-03003222.jpg
http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj234/A...07-03003156.jpg

"Isn't all that a lot of wires and bulky capacitors just for a dinky little red light in your butt?" you ask. "Couldn't you have just used 2 AAA batteries and called it a day?" Quiet, you. Nobody wants to hear that reasoning. We're too busy doing things the complicated way! laugh.gif wacko.gif

But the capacitors are doing their job nicely. Here is the tail light, shining bright, about 10 seconds after the wheel was stopped:
http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj234/A...07-03004452.jpg

And it was brighter than it looks in the pictures. Camera compensates, and such. Well, it's pretty ugly (unless you like that look...I actually kinda do, heh) but at least it isn't heavy. I will most likely swap out the capacitors for a stack of 4 Li button cells (scavenged from mobos) and a really simple zener shunt charging circuit like the one found in crank flashlights such as these.

But at least for now, I have a tail light that lights up brightly and will stay bright even when I stop. biggrin.gif

More to come,
Adam O.
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MikeGyver
Posted: July 03, 2011 06:19 am
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Psh not impressed... you need more (and bigger) capacitors. laugh.gif
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MacFromOK
Posted: July 03, 2011 06:28 am
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QUOTE (AdamO @ July 03, 2011 12:10 am)
and I'm having a blast.

The measure of a successful hobby IMO. beer.gif


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AdamO
Posted: July 03, 2011 06:33 am
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QUOTE (MikeGyver @ July 03, 2011 06:19 am)
Psh not impressed... you need more (and bigger) capacitors. laugh.gif

I've got two more just like those...but I'm saving them to power my wristwatch laugh.gif laugh.gif

-Adam O.
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tekwiz
Posted: July 03, 2011 08:37 pm
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QUOTE
Also, since I don't mind a little extra weight on this bike, I have been considering the option of strapping a small 12V SLA to it somewhere and using the dynamo to keep it charged. My plan is to get all my bells and whistles built and set up first, then see if the battery will be necessary.


One advantage of a battery is that you can carry charge from home, so you're not limited to the tiny amount you can generate onroute.
My favorite headlight method is a narrow spot pattern MRC-16 track light bulb. The 20W versions offer an excellent lighting pattern & are cheap. There's also the MRC-11 series of smaller lamps, available down to 5W & in 6V versions.
Housings are easy to make...just use a can or plastic container of similar diameter & cut a round hole in the bottom for the lamp. A spring pushing from behind on the lamps connection boss holds it in place.
These aren't as efficient as the new LEDs, but have the advantage of a good beam pattern, easy availability, & low cost.
I've used them on several bikes now, including my last one that had a 125cc engine & motor cum generator driven by an O ring belt from the crankshaft. I had to periodically rotate the generator because it was so hard on the bearings...they're not made for side loads. But I did get >36W from a cordless drill motor.


BTW: A small microswitch siliconed to one brake lever gives you cheap n easy brake lights. wink.gif


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For to you, kings & armies are things mighty & enduring.
To him, mere toys of the moment, to be overturned at the flick of a finger.

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AdamO
Posted: July 03, 2011 09:47 pm
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QUOTE (tekwiz @ July 03, 2011 08:37 pm)
BTW: A small microswitch siliconed to one brake lever gives you cheap n easy brake lights. wink.gif

I love this forum. Totally doing that lol!

-Adam O.
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MikeGyver
Posted: July 04, 2011 12:50 am
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dood, capacitor bank traaaailller.
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Nothing40
Posted: July 04, 2011 02:17 am
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I once made a ghetto headlight with some kind of 'unknown' 12V halogen bulb,a Nicd pack,and a stepper motor-turned-generator..That particular stepper would crank out 25W or so,and wasn't a huuge drag to pedal against,but you could feel it.
Some stepper motors can make decent generators,if you feel like fiddling around. smile.gif


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AdamO
Posted: July 04, 2011 03:13 am
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QUOTE (MikeGyver @ July 04, 2011 12:50 am)
dood, capacitor bank traaaailller.

Aright aright aright I get it blush.gif . We all gotta learn our own way, can't we? I want to strap a battery on there and I'm thinking laptop battery pack. Just wish I knew how to charge one properly...can I just apply a regulated DC voltage to it?

-Adam O.
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AwesomeMatt
Posted: July 04, 2011 05:48 am
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Sweet. Well documenting the nowhere-near-best solution, I approve! smile.gif

Since I scored an alum mountain bike for $25 from a garage sale, I've been hitting the road more often. At least one 3-hour trip a week. I made the first two longer highway daytrips of my life this last week. Did 110km (~65 miles) broken up in 4 pieces with at least an hour break each, and then a couple days ago I did 90km (~55 miles) through the foothills with only 15 minutes rest, upwind the whole way (pretty much my max), took 4.5 hours.

Every trip I'm noticing things I'm missing and buying/building/bolting them on.

For example, after the 110km trip, I thought it was probably a bad idea to be going 2 hours in the sun without water, so I got a water bottle and carrier.

After a 60km trip hauling junk in a backpack, I thought it was a bad idea to not have a cargo rack, so I found a wrong-sized alum one I was gifted 15 years ago that I never used and then bent/bashed/bolted it on.

After a trip where I kept trying to fish candy out of my cargo shorts, and the weight twisting the fabric, I patched and added a triangular frame bag/pouch.

One time after biking home the morning after a bachelor party I was revisiting some childhood trails in the park and discovered the city removed the nice wide Y at the bottom of a big hill and replaced it with a plain T, forcing you to stop at the bottom (waste of a nice big hill). So I decided to take the path less (never) traveled by, carving blindly through 3' tall grass, and found it made all the difference... because they city had also put up an 8" drainage barrier snake, held in place by 1' tall stakes every 2' at the very bottom on the side of the adjoining path.

I noticed it through the grass maybe 0.1sec before impact, enough time to make one steering adjustment to aim my tire between stakes. Hit the snake at a wide angle going probably 30 miles an hour, tumbled forward forward immediately with my bike and blacked out from the Gs. A pedal must've clipped one of the stakes right after I hit the snake, 'cause mid-cartwheel I noticed I was barrel rolling too. Tucked my chin, shut my jaw and curled my shoulder, blacked out again, upside down with my bike over me. Faded in again before impact, took the tumble quite well, made the bike take all of it. After stopping I noticed my left leg was wrapped around the frame at weird angles and I presumed it was broken and I was in shock, but, nope, un-pretzeled it and was fine. Got up, dusted myself off in front of shocked bystanders, pointed at the snake and said "Well... that's new", put my sunglasess back on, and continued home, like a boss. Total damage: 1/2" tear on my jeans and a dime worth of road rash on my knee, a damaged paint job and gouges taken out of handlebars/frame/etc. After than I thought a helmet was probably a good idea. My old helmet doesn't have a visor, so I put a baseball cap on underneath and then carved an indentation for the hat button so it wouldn't press into my skull. Presto, helmet.

Had a woman pull over ahead of me one night and tell me I was effectively invisible to her until she was a few feet away, so I cannibalized an old bike for some reflector upgrades and an incandescent lamp. Clearly it is in need of an LED overhaul. (4x AA = 45 minutes of weak light).

Soon I'll add a kickstand and a fake lock to it as well. Good locks are heavy. But an unlocked bike is like having a "steal me" sign. So I'm going to make a fake lock out of PVC (U-lock or cord, not sure). I figure if I eliminate all the opportunistic thieves, the thieves who'll get close enough to a lock to touch and inspect it won't be stopped by a lock anyway. I've modeled my safety by studying the security theater of the TSA and Homeland Security.

I'll be closely monitoring this thread to see what other mediocre ideas you come up with that I can imitate smile.gif.

...

QUOTE
I had a bunch of those high-brightness square-shaped 4-legged LEDs (red) that I had scrapped from solar garden lights and figured this was a good time to break them out.


Wait.. I think you've un-engineered this. You took solar powered LEDs and gutted them to be powered from a dynamo? Why not have just used the unit as-was? Solar powered LEDs are a great idea.

You could also try attaching neodymium magnets to the spokes themselves and hook up a genny that way.
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GPG
Posted: July 04, 2011 07:04 am
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The council changed an intersection. I was not sober. I saw some acquaintances across the intersection. I rode over the islands in the intersection(sloped curbs) only to find the original vertical curb and the last island formed a wheel trapper (too fast to wash speed off) Iwent over the bars and broke my jaw.
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AdamO
Posted: July 04, 2011 09:05 am
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QUOTE (AwesomeMatt @ July 04, 2011 05:48 am)
Sweet. Well documenting the nowhere-near-best solution, I approve! smile.gif

While I appreciate your approval, I'd rather put together a better solution. I feel kinda silly for throwing that together, actually. Meh, at least it didn't take me more than 20 minutes...I think a 5Ah SLA like the one I've got would store more than enough energy to power whatever I want.

QUOTE
I'll be closely monitoring this thread to see what other mediocre ideas you come up with that I can imitate smile.gif.

Funny, and here I was thinking I had some good ideas. Well, sometimes I guess I don't see the straight path for the detour. But I get to where I need to be eventually...

QUOTE
QUOTE
I had a bunch of those high-brightness square-shaped 4-legged LEDs (red) that I had scrapped from solar garden lights and figured this was a good time to break them out.


Wait.. I think you've un-engineered this. You took solar powered LEDs and gutted them to be powered from a dynamo? Why not have just used the unit as-was? Solar powered LEDs are a great idea.

You could also try attaching neodymium magnets to the spokes themselves and hook up a genny that way.

Eughh no, I salvaged those LEDs a long time ago and have only now re-purposed them. The solar charging circuits in those little garden lamps would not have been practical to use anyway (but then again, I'm no model for practicality, as this thread clearly shows). And I did think about strapping some relay coils to the chainstay and having HDD magnets (in the spokes) zip by them to induce currents and make some lights blink. Then I decided that I could only handle so much impracticality for one week laugh.gif

Further delightfully retarded ideas/concepts:
-cabinet hinges bolted to the rear hub, serving as foldable pegs to act as footrests for a rear passenger (have done this many times and the lack of a place to put your feet is the kicker)
-rack mounted clothes hanger (for drying clothes on long tours...doing it one garment at a time is a bitch, even if you only have one change)
-frame mounted anemometer
-seat/handlebar heater
-kitty litter box panniers

Enjoy!
Adam O.
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AwesomeMatt
Posted: July 04, 2011 09:24 am
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QUOTE
Funny, and here I was thinking I had some good ideas.


"This is quickly becoming a downward spiral of ugly uselessness and I'm having a blast."

On a philosophical tangent... I enjoy seeing things done the 'wrong' or unconventional way. 99.9% of what we see in the world are things done the right way. The right way that is the result of many mental processes, many physical evolutions, etc. Most of that 99.9% is invisible, and I often take it for granted, but I also don't understand most of it. Most of life goes by muffling all the human genius and curiosity that went into something, and if you want to be able to create new things, you have to train your brain to unmuffle that and get used to thinking that way.

It's part of the same reason I enjoy watching lower-level sports sometimes. Because you get to see people do dumb things and you see how and why it fails.. and *why* the professionals never do this or that.

Most invention is by accident. In fact, you can argue, all invention is by accident. Everything else is just optimizing something that was already invented. If you refuse to dig back a few layers before going forward, you'll miss finding alternate solutions with different potentials. Like Jim's formula for whitening office-yellowed plastic. Not going to find that in a hardware store or manual.

Curiosity says "Why not use giant eletrolytics to store charge for LEDs on a bike?". Answer says, it works, but it's bulky and weak. As expected. That's fine, where else in the world would I have had a chance to see it done anyway? wink.gif. If anyone wants what's cheap and easy, they can go to a store and buy it.
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Village Idiot
Posted: July 04, 2011 10:55 am
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QUOTE (AwesomeMatt @ July 04, 2011 02:24 am)
99.9% of what we see in the world are things done the right way.

And what was the name of your planet again?
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AwesomeMatt
Posted: July 04, 2011 11:17 am
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And what was the name of your planet again?


Well that's just it. Unless you stop and think about it, everything seems natural to be within a very narrow margin, and we all bitch about and judge that last 0.1%. But what we think of a disaster is pretty much just nitpicking split hairs. Everything you think is "clearly" supposed to be one way, was once upon a time not at all obvious. Everything defined was once open ended. The biggest fails you see in anything that's manufactured is still getting probably everything 99.9% right. Even the worst product out there is a finely tuned needle in a haystack of all the screwups and less optimal decisions that were possible.
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davelectronic
Posted: July 04, 2011 08:14 pm
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Hi All members
I have Norton internet security, and the start of this thread has security risks in the picture links, be advised, my security is a proper full payed for security installation. Dave.Total threats found: 1

Small-whitebg-red Viruses

Threats found: 1
Here is a complete list: (for more information about a specific threat, click on the Threat Name below)
Threat Name: Bloodhound.Exploit.281
Location: http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj215/y...24114904891.gif

Don't use these links. mad.gif not suggesting it the members fault, AdamO.

But the images from photo bucket have been blocked on my PC by the virus protection as a serious threat.


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tekwiz
Posted: July 04, 2011 09:20 pm
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QUOTE (AdamO @ July 03, 2011 06:13 pm)
QUOTE (MikeGyver @ July 04, 2011 12:50 am)
dood, capacitor bank traaaailller.

Aright aright aright I get it blush.gif . We all gotta learn our own way, can't we? I want to strap a battery on there and I'm thinking laptop battery pack. Just wish I knew how to charge one properly...can I just apply a regulated DC voltage to it?

-Adam O.

In this case, I'd say yes. The only worry with charging lithium packs is preventing overcharge, as the terminal voltage actually drops slightly as the battery approaches full charge.
I doubt that any pedal powered generator will be capable of seriously overcharging a lappy pack. My setup didn't overcharge with an engine powered generator.
As long as you use the right charger at home, I don't think you'll have any problems.
As for SLA batteries, only a big 14.5V zener set up as a shunt regulator is needed for complete overcharge protection.


@AM: Nope, 99.9% of the worlds products are built to be as cheap as possible. Every other consideration is secondary to this. Only custom built "cost is no object" products are built right.




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For to you, kings & armies are things mighty & enduring.
To him, mere toys of the moment, to be overturned at the flick of a finger.

Fortuna favet fortibus.
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AwesomeMatt
Posted: July 04, 2011 09:48 pm
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But the images from photo bucket have been blocked on my PC by the virus protection as a serious threat.


Perhaps you're already infected and getting some redirects. He didn't even link any .gifs. They're all jpegs.
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davelectronic
Posted: July 05, 2011 12:33 am
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Done a complete scan my system is clean, its a very rigorous protection program, if i click the link it advises me of a threat from a virus, my program gives two options, leave the page, or continue, the strange thing is i looked at the pic's not long after they where posted, that then was fine, its not unheard of for files to be hacked, i wont click them any more, Norton says its a threat in there data base of known threats. Dave. smile.gif


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