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> Crane's Next Cnc, On to #2
crane550
Posted: May 18, 2011 04:24 am
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*Edited title as this project is no longer a 6x9

It's true. I am starting my next CNC. This one is designed to be a wee bit bigger...

Here are the objectives:

* Take full advantage of my 2100mm rails. Thats 84", minus a 12in wide carriage gives me a full 6 feet of Y travel. X will be pushed out to 120in. This will give me approx 9 feet of X travel. The idea was to take full advantage of my 84" and 80" rails without wasting any. It makes no sense to cut off a foot or two just to throw away.
* 1000IPM rapids. I want her to scoot right along.
* Heavy construction. I am guessing 2000lbs+. Gantry will probably be in the 500lbs range. Base will be welded steel.
*No "crib" design. That is, the gantry can be completely moved to the end of the machine, and your left with a flat, unobstructed work surface. Slide a sheet of whatever right on and away you go.

A lot of my inspiration is coming from a local guy here in Boise. He managed to piss a lot of the MechMate guys off by setting a new standard when it comes to these. He runs a cabinet shop here, and his machine is quite incredible.

Anyways, a lot of the components are a direct copy of his. In fact, he made the transmission cases, bearing mounts, and sold me most of my rail. I owe him all the credit for the basic design.

I will be varying from his a bit. I am not going to go quite as heavy as I would like to be a tad bit faster then he is (he is in the 800 range, plus my motors are naturally a bit faster then the ones he is running) and I will also take some cosmetic liberties.

Here is his machine:

user posted image

And his style of rack & pinion. He does not go cheap, thats for sure.
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user posted image

The build for this machine will be quite a bit slower then my other one. I do not plan on taking any shortcuts to get it up and running. I want to have it pretty much thought out before I start. Most of it is.

Here are some technical specs:

Nema 34 Rack and Pinion. 4:1 reduction, 1200oz steppers powered by 4x Gecko 203's. At 7 amps each they can put out a decent amount of power to get this thing moving along. These motors are top of the line Vexta's by the way.

THK HSR and SHS 20 rails. Perfect for a machine this size. Ron is using 25's, and he said if he were to to it again he would go with the 20's as the 25's are ridiculous. HSR and SHS rails are designed for a load from any direction. They are the strongest that THK makes, and THK is one of the best brands out there for linear guides. You can't kill this stuff.

Probably going to go with a cheap Chinese spindle, probably in the 3-4KW range. I hope to get by without water cooling but we will see. I am not a huge fan of having to put an aquarium under my table. Many guys are getting by without, and I think I will probably be able to. A lot of money can easily be spend on a spindle. I would rather put a lot more money into other things first. Plus a lot of people are having really good luck with these cheap-o's and recommend them.

Parts I have:

Been collecting for the last few months. Already have

1x 84" SHS-20 rail. This makes 1/2 of my Y
2x 80" HSR-20 rails. Good chunk of my X. These can be butted together to extent travel. 120" rails would be nice but they are waaaaaaaay expensive.
1x 40" HSR to complete the full 120" for one of my X guides (still need to find another),
1x 40" SHS-20 to split for my Z. 20" should be more then enough! That will leave me with about a foot of travel.

user posted image

Rack and pinion:

Most of the rack is purchased. Got enough for the Y, and half for the X. I also have 3 transmissions (2x for X, and one for Y). These are completely built and ready to go with the Nema 34 standard. This includes almost everything needed, save some hardware.

user posted image

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The Z is ballscrew. Have that too.

user posted image

Anyways, my own take of the design. A work in progress, no doubt.

user posted image

user posted image


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damien
Posted: May 18, 2011 12:37 pm
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Crane did you get my pm a month or so ago?

Damien


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Wow you look quite normal for a geek.

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AwesomeMatt
Posted: May 18, 2011 02:23 pm
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Nothing to contribute, just posting to say I muchly enjoyed your previous build thread and will track this one as well. I luvs me some project logs.
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tekwiz
Posted: May 18, 2011 06:47 pm
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Why rack & pinion? No advantages over ballscrews & plenty of disadvantages, including unpredictable backlash that changes with number of operating hours. That is 1850's technology. Using ballscrews would also add at least 25% to your effective motor power even if all else remains the same.
I'll bet that ballscrew capsules wouldn't be much more expensive, either, but would last much, much longer.
You might also look into the Thompson line of precision shafting & linear ball bearings for your slides. Using both this & ballscrews will more than double your effective motor performance & increase speed & accuracy considerably. Cheaper knockoffs are available.
They would also greatly simplify construction, especially if minimal machining facilities are available, because they are basically bolt on units & can be precision aligned in the field. Another huge advantage is that these systems are very tolerant of minimal lubrication, something that's important for woodworking...dry silicone lube can be used throughout.

You will also need provisions for providing an absolutely flat surface for your work area. A relatively easy way is to make the base table plate from aluminim, then machine the surface after final installation, using the machine itself. This will guarantee that your work surface is completely planar to your slides. A wooden sacrificial top layer can then be added if desired. No weldment will ever be close enough to use as is, & any plate stiff enough not to sag will be both heavy & expensive.


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crane550
Posted: May 19, 2011 06:03 am
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QUOTE
Why rack & pinion? No advantages over ballscrews & plenty of disadvantages,


I don't think so....if this is such a bad design then why do virtually ALL DIY builds use this mechanic, as well as most professional machines?

Advantages: Good resistance to dust and particles. The design faces the rack down so dust falls away. Also, no lubrication is required. No whipping. Easier alignment. Lower cost. A very clear no brainer. Not even close when it comes to a machine like this.

QUOTE
including unpredictable backlash that changes with number of operating hours.............I'll bet that ballscrew capsules wouldn't be much more expensive, either, but would last much, much longer.


The teeth of the pinion gear are more shallow then the rack teeth. This is tensioned with a spring which keeps the pinion gear pressed up against the rack. The rack can wear quite a bit before it leads to backlash. I hear of people changing their ballscrews all the time....never even once heard of someone replacing rack.

QUOTE
That is 1850's technology.


So are hammers, saws, and screwdrivers. They still work great for me.

QUOTE
Using ballscrews would also add at least 25% to your effective motor power even if all else remains the same.


Thats why my motors are twice as powerful as needed.

QUOTE
You might also look into the Thompson line of precision shafting & linear ball bearings for your slides. Using both this & ballscrews will more than double your effective motor performance & increase speed & accuracy considerably.

Cheaper knockoffs are available.
They would also greatly simplify construction, especially if minimal machining facilities are available, because they are basically bolt on units & can be precision aligned in the field. Another huge advantage is that these systems are very tolerant of minimal lubrication, something that's important for woodworking...dry silicone lube can be used throughout.


Why on earth would I trade SHS rails for Thompsons? Especially since I already have them???

QUOTE
You will also need provisions for providing an absolutely flat surface for your work area. A relatively easy way is to make the base table plate from aluminim, then machine the surface after final installation, using the machine itself. This will guarantee that your work surface is completely planar to your slides. A wooden sacrificial top layer can then be added if desired. No weldment will ever be close enough to use as is, & any plate stiff enough not to sag will be both heavy & expensive.


Standard practice is to level a sacrificial layer.

Tekwiz, we did the exact same run around on my last build. From the very beginning I had everything thought out and planned. Despite all your criticism with the stiffness of the table, the timing of the motors, the so called "backlash" that my CNC was prone to I still managed to make a machine that exceeded even my own expectations. I also made more money in my hobby time with a table driven by hardware store all-thread and nuts and bolts from Home Depot then I did at my normal job, which pays decent, by the way. This is a machine made of pine and 2x4's.

What I am doing here is nothing new. I am adding my own touches to it, but there is really nothing new here. It works. And it works very very well. If you didn't notice the first pictures are of a table that will kick the pants off of anything on the commercial market. And there is less then $1500 worth of parts into it. I spend hours and hours a day researching this stuff, and then I DO IT. There is an established way of doing things. I take the best from all the different designs out there and make it into something that will work for me. Just like my last build, which is hitting 600ipm rapids and will not stall no matter what you put in front of it.

If you want to build a table that will beat this, knock yourself out. Some people talk and some people do. I do.


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GPG
Posted: May 19, 2011 06:29 am
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AwesomeMatt
Posted: May 19, 2011 08:28 am
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Crane - Sounds like you're getting a bit upset. Relax. Criticism and feedback around here isn't like in most other places. Just about everyone here is comfortable enough with each other that they forgo the superfluous 'just in case' sugarcoating you'd otherwise expect. Try not to take someone suggesting you do things a different way as an insult to your design or workmanship. Heck, often tinkerers aren't even making genuine criticism, they're just making suggestions as conversation.

Most people presume anything is up for discussion. People will chime in what they would do instead, or where they would take a project, or suggest improvements/solutions even though you didn't say you had any problems and weren't asking for help. If you'd like a given thread to be a little more concise and read-only, (a more strict project log), and less participatory, just say so.. so people know how to avoid hijacking.

QUOTE
Despite all your criticism with the stiffness of the table, the timing of the motors, the so called "backlash" that my CNC was prone to I still managed to make a machine that exceeded even my own expectations.


Perhaps you misunderstand the feedback you've got. People here give feedback to help ensure you succeed, get the best result, and dodge most of the blunders along the way... not to nay-say and discourage you.

Tekwiz in particular, isn't some random inexperienced hobbyist. He's a trained machinist with decades more experience than you. That doesn't make him right, but at worst, it means his advice is as valid an alternative as anything else you've read, and probably a lot more so than most of the hobby CNCers combined. Your previous machine exceeded your expectations, but IIRC you had a handful of issues along the way and in the end, probably wasn't the best way to have gone about getting the same result and admitted such. More fun to evolve the design yourself, and faster to getting it up and running sooner, rather than perfect later. Consider where people are coming from, Tekwiz probably just has higher standards than you, in terms of what was acceptable from his experience and how he'd go about it.

There wasn't anything harsh said, just suggestions of things to look into, things to consider, and a few questions about why you made the choices you did.
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MikeGyver
Posted: May 19, 2011 12:25 pm
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QUOTE (crane550 @ May 19, 2011 06:03 am)
I also made more money in my hobby time with a table driven by hardware store all-thread and nuts and bolts from Home Depot then I did at my normal job, which pays decent, by the way.

damn... how do you find so much business? and what types of stuff do you make?

You're small table inspired me to build a CNC plasma table. I've done countless hours or research and have started on a design, it's just a matter of investing ~$1500 + plasma now. thumbsup.gif
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crane550
Posted: May 19, 2011 02:31 pm
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There is work out there- and a lot of it. Anyone who sits around saying "I can't get a job, the economy is too bad" just has a bad attitude. The same people were unemployed during the Bush years while we were still on the climb (not making any implications on who killed the economy, just noting the time)

Basically it comes down to who is willing to work. I am willing to get up early, stay late, and not give excuses and the work finds me.

Learning to get organized has really helped. My business depends on spreadsheets. That and going 400% for every customer- sometimes it hurts. But I have a record number of pending jobs right now (well, 3 days ago I did I have been catching up!) and even more in promising leads. Also 70% of my work right now is return customers. I get emails almost daily saying "I love this guitar! Can you build me another one?"

It's just about being willing to go after it, and take ownership of your success or failure. Success is not without it's mistakes, it's about persistence.

I'm starting to sound like a motivational speaker, I definitely don't want to do that. I have not even cracked my Redbull yet.... Beter get running. Time to go to my "real" job.

Alex


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tekwiz
Posted: May 19, 2011 06:03 pm
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QUOTE (MikeGyver @ May 19, 2011 03:25 am)
QUOTE (crane550 @ May 19, 2011 06:03 am)
I also made more money in my hobby time with a table driven by hardware store all-thread and nuts and bolts from Home Depot then I did at my normal job, which pays decent, by the way.

damn... how do you find so much business? and what types of stuff do you make?

You're small table inspired me to build a CNC plasma table. I've done countless hours or research and have started on a design, it's just a matter of investing ~$1500 + plasma now. thumbsup.gif

Fortune Tool. Supplier of cheap Chinese plasma cutters, starting well under $500. The exact same machines that are relabeled & sold as some of the cheaper "american" brands.
The lower priced units are cheaper than a consumables kit for the equvalent Thermal Dynamics equipment.
The machines are of decent quality...I know mine has served me well.

@Matt: You're right, the CNC equipment I am familiar with operates with accuracies in the millionths of an inch, which BTW, is the reason why ballscrews are replaced periodically & most construction is solid cast iron or specially prepared high accuracy weldments, annealed & aged. When every piece of work that a machine produces has to have dependable tolerances within a tenth of a thou, extreme precision is the rule.
Far be it from me to interfere with someone who wants to go it alone, some experience cannot be gained any other way.


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For to you, kings & armies are things mighty & enduring.
To him, mere toys of the moment, to be overturned at the flick of a finger.

Fortuna favet fortibus.
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crane550
Posted: May 20, 2011 02:31 am
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Tekwiz,

Believe me, I am not going at this alone. I am getting help. A lot of it. By people who have built these machines. I stood in front of the machine in the pictures and watched it do its magic. It worked great. I want the results he is getting. I am building my machine to match those results. It will cut cabinets, guitars, signs, aluminum parts, and whatever crap I want to build. And the people who have built these machines are saying things that are very different then what your saying.

I have told you this many times... This is NOT a machine made to mill steel. Not even close. I can mill aluminum with great results. But the intent was NEVER to mill steel! Get off of your little "accuracy" bandwagon. It's not the point.

Dutch Force is a great place with a lot of great knowledge. There are some very smart people here. But the focus is not CNC's. I have had a lot of questions along the way, and have learned a great deal, but I have not learned it here. I have not asked the questions here, because the average user here has not built or extensively studies CNC. I am posting here only to show people my progress and hopefully spark some interest and give everyone some info on this fascinating field. It's not to get information. I have other places for that.

Tekwiz, everyone seems to get that but you. And I'm frustrated as hell that I have to clear all this up on the first page of my build log. I am going to build my CNC as I see fit. If you think differently build your own.


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crane550
Posted: May 20, 2011 02:57 am
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QUOTE (MikeGyver @ May 19, 2011 12:25 pm)
You're small table inspired me to build a CNC plasma table. I've done countless hours or research and have started on a design, it's just a matter of investing ~$1500 + plasma now. thumbsup.gif

I have always wanted to build a plasma table too. The great thing about them is they do not require too much rigidity to get amazing results. Depending on the size you want to do there are a couple good options. Most go to R&P for axises longer then 6'. Usually most guys take advantage of the full length of ACME rods which usually ship in 3 or 6' increments. Same reason I am building over 6 feet of travel in my 6x9, it really does not cost too much more to build a bit bigger then you think you need.

I have not looked into the plasma too much. I would imagine that a lot of guys are going the 80/20 route but I don't know for sure. I have not spent too much time looking into what the plasma guys are doing.

The 80/20 aluminum might also be good for slag resistance....might be wrong on that one but it kinda makes sense...

If you have not looked into it, you might check some of the builds at cncrouterparts.com. I have used his ACME nuts, and love them. I have heard fantastic things about his R&P setup. For a long time I was considering his linear solutions. I was eventually won over to the THK rails for various reasons. For a plasma you would probably go with one of the lighter duty rails then the SHS or HSR's. They are made for extreme stress in all directions, some other solutions don't offer this, but would be more then suitable for the stress (or lack of) for a plasma.

The nice thing about a plasma table is there is not much force required to "cut" thru your material. This means you can make your gantry light and efficient.

Anyways, the CNCRouterparts and 80/20 make bolt together machines a snap, and they seem to be getting very good results. They make it for R&P and ACME. Also, for a plasma you can get VERY good rapids. Not sure if anyone is using this solution for plasma or not, but it might be worth looking into. Hope that helps!

Alex


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GPG
Posted: May 20, 2011 04:30 am
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QUOTE

Believe me, I am not going at this alone. I am getting help. A lot of it. By people who have built these machines. I stood in front of the machine in the pictures and watched it do its magic. It worked great. I want the results he is getting. I am building my machine to match those results. It will cut cabinets, guitars, signs, aluminum parts, and whatever crap I want to build. And the people who have built these machines are saying things that are very different then what your saying.

I have told you this many times... This is NOT a machine made to mill steel. Not even close. I can mill aluminum with great results. But the intent was NEVER to mill steel! Get off of your little "accuracy" bandwagon. It's not the point.

Dutch Force is a great place with a lot of great knowledge. There are some very smart people here. But the focus is not CNC's. I have had a lot of questions along the way, and have learned a great deal, but I have not learned it here. I have not asked the questions here, because the average user here has not built or extensively studies CNC. I am posting here only to show people my progress and hopefully spark some interest and give everyone some info on this fascinating field. It's not to get information. I have other places for that.

Tekwiz, everyone seems to get that but you. And I'm frustrated as hell that I have to clear all this up on the first page of my build log. I am going to build my CNC as I see fit. If you think differently build your own.


It seems my "thumbs up" post "disappeared" so here's a repost.
thumbsup.gif
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AwesomeMatt
Posted: May 20, 2011 05:35 am
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QUOTE
It seems my "thumbs up" post "disappeared" so here's a repost.


... http://www.dutchforce.com/~eforum/index.ph...ndpost&p=321386 <-- This one? Still there. *shrugs*. Two thumbs up it is! biggrin.gif

QUOTE
I am posting here only to show people my progress


Again, a simple, polite, "I'd like to use this thread as a project build log, not a discussion thread. I've already figured out everything I need, so to keep it tidy, please don't offer suggestions or advice unless I solicit it." at the start of your thread would have resolved this, since it is slightly atypical of a *discussion* forum. And again, no need to be aggressive towards those offering advice regardless.

QUOTE
Anyways, the CNCRouterparts and 80/20 make bolt together machines a snap, and they seem to be getting very good results.


http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/938329...-bearing-system <-- I came across this yesterday. A guy who's been making CNCs for people for years, and is trying to keep everything open-source, decided to create a Kickstarter project for better rails and linear bearings. The project is fully (actually, more than doubly) funded. He hopes to get price down to $0.10/centimeter.

Hard to see it in the pictures, (video at the above link shows it better):

user posted image

user posted image

http://www.makerslide.com/ <-- Website for the slide rails.
http://www.buildlog.net/ <-- Website for the rest of his opensource stuff, kits, etc.
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MikeGyver
Posted: May 20, 2011 05:49 am
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QUOTE (crane550 @ May 20, 2011 02:57 am)
QUOTE (MikeGyver @ May 19, 2011 12:25 pm)
You're small table inspired me to build a CNC plasma table. I've done countless hours or research and have started on a design, it's just a matter of investing ~$1500 + plasma now.  thumbsup.gif

I have always wanted to build a plasma table too....

I've design a similar setup to the rack & pinion you have pictured above using a tension spring to main a constant (zero) backlash on the downward facing gear, only it doesn't involve expensive rails. I'd never do the threaded rod style for plasma... you can't even move the gantry by hand, the machine has to do it for you. With R&P you can push the gantry out of the way and just re-home it before cutting. Only the Z will have a ballscrew so the motor isn't 'holding' the weight of the torch head.
The 300ish oz-in tq motors I was looking at from hobbycnc were going to provide something like 70lbs of push (times 2 for the X-axis with motors on each end of the gantry) so you could probably literally ride on the gantry. Bridge will be aluminum box tubing so it should provide good rapids. And the only plasma cutter I've really even considered is the Hypertherm 45 which is $1500-$2k. With torch height control and a good plasma machine you can make laser-quality edges.
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crane550
Posted: May 22, 2011 04:56 am
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A laser table would be fun too. I see it used a lot for wood, not sure how well it has been used by the DIY guys. Like the plasma, I have not spend much time looking into it.

Had a good wad of cash to spend on the table today...but unfortunately what started as a small cut from a little tussle my dog had with someone else's dog turned into a pretty nasty infection. Oscar the pooch will be ingesting quite a bit of steel in the next two weeks in the form of antibiotics and vet visits. sad.gif

Oh well. Just sell a few more I guess. Plenty of people who like twang and want to build their own guitars. So I keep making them.

Well, it's a bowl of captain crunch and a movie with the wife for me. I will post back here later. Don't have much news in the way of my CNC build, but it's coming. I don't plan on taking any quick shortcuts to get it running on this one, so this build is going to take a while.

I also need to make room in the shop for a 8x10 3,000 pound steel object. Yipee!


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crane550
Posted: July 14, 2011 02:50 am
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Well, it does not seem like much has happened although a lot has. Mostly in the form of purchasing more components. It's amazing how fast the parts add up. Picked up my ball screws for the Z axis today, as well as found some steel in a local scrapyard that will fit the bill.

A little bit has changed as far as planning goes since my last post. My wife and I decided to sell our house, which means I will also move out of my shop. We plan to rent for a bit while we shop for a new house, which means probably renting a place with a 2-3 car garage which I will try to cram in all my equipment. Now taking space into the equation I decided to make the table a bit smaller for now. It will still be oversized for guitars, but this machine should have some good upgrades and give me a bit more cutting area to boot.

The plan is to cut the 84" SHS rail into two and use that for my Y. That should give me an fairly easy 3', maybe a hair more. My two 80" rails will then be used for the X. I will cut one of my 40" rails in two down to 18" each for the Z.

I am a little disappointed that I am not going 6x9ish now, but I think this is a smarter move considering all. I just need to reduce the footprint. I will be using the exact same design, just made a bit smaller.

At this point I have 3 of 4 motors needed. The Z will take a smaller one. All rails and rack is accounted for, might need to pick up a couple shoes to keep everything symmetrical.

Working on the .skp right now. Stay tuned!


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crane550
Posted: July 14, 2011 05:40 am
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Making progress on the .skp file. Trying to make everything in the file match without getting too detailed. I figure just the outside dimensions are necessary for the THK components. Trouble is the damn things are metric, and Google Sketchup only supports imperial, or so it seems. Happy conversions!

user posted image

Stay tuned, there is a lot more to come. I am waaaaaaay too invested in this project already to loose interest.


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crane550
Posted: July 16, 2011 11:09 pm
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user posted image

user posted image

Well, I found my steel. Two beams that are 5x10, one that is 3x5, and several that are 1x2. All for 30 cents a pound! Checked them today, and all the corners are very square. I think these will do nicely. They are bigger then I intended to do, but I see only advantages.

Time to start rockin a frame. Be sure to check back, and don't forget your welding goggles.

Alex


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crane550
Posted: July 25, 2011 06:37 am
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Working some more on my model for the carriage. I am not sure, I might revert back to the 6x9, I just don't know at this point. Anyways, here are my ideas for the carriage. The 4:1 reduction is already fabricated, and I picked up the large Z plate earlier this week. I want to get this whole thing drawn up on Sketchup before I start fabbing parts for the real deal- just in case I have not thought of something.

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crane550
Posted: July 27, 2011 05:42 am
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This is completely unnecessary but I was playing with a rendering program and thought this looked cool. My model has a ways to go, but we are getting there. Going to pick up the steel for the gantry tomorrow. Soon it will be time to start assembly.

user posted image

Alex


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jman 31
Posted: July 27, 2011 02:45 pm
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Was that rendered from Google Sketch-up?

Really enjoy your CNC build logs by the way! I wish I had the patience to build one myself. I will probably get a small one off of eBay at some point. I am getting to a point in my projects and products that it is just going to be a necessity soon!


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crane550
Posted: September 24, 2011 07:02 am
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Sorry its been a while since my last update. I have been going to school full time at Boise State University working on my ME degree. It's been a lot of work, so I have not had much free time to work on this. Anyways, here is the latest progress:

The Z plate is actually at the machine shop right now getting the keyways put in for the Y rail blocks. I decided to go ahead and use my local guys to machine the parts for me, as I would like my Z to be dead nuts accurate. My guys do an excellent job. I am really looking forward to getting it back. It will probably set me back $400 or so, but I think it will be worth it.

Just doing some quick math on my Z right now, to see approx what everything will weight once it's done.

Rear Z Plate - 8x18x.75
Slide Z Plate - 8x18x.75
Spindle Plate - 8x10x.75
Guide blocks - 2.5x6x1.5

Adds up to about 321 cubic inches, if my math is right. Minus a bit for machining and holes, and such. Google says 6061 aluminum runs .098lbs per CI, which means I'm looking about 32lbs just for the back plate, the slide, and the router mount. This does not include spindle, THK rails, screw, Z and Y motors, dust collectors, Y drive, and other goodies that will be along for the ride. Honestly it seems lighter then I was expecting. I was thinking it would be in the 50 to 60 range. Still, I think it will be plenty stiff. .75 seems to be about right.

Here is the model, not completely current but enough to get anyone up to speed.

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Here is the current state of my table:

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Cleaning up the beams. An old worn out sanding pad does the job nicely.

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Also working on my gantry beam. Got the holes drilled for the bottom THK rail. I am actually going to nut these ones since I do not have the patience to tap every single one.

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Drilling pilot holes:

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And that will get you pretty much up to speed on this project. More happening soon.


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MikeGyver
Posted: September 25, 2011 12:48 pm
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Good to see you've been getting some work done on this.
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crane550
Posted: September 28, 2011 01:45 am
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I stopped by my machine guys to see if they had started, but they hadn't. Just for kicks we threw the parts on the scale to see what they weight in. Looks pretty hefty. If anyone is running a 5hp spindle, I would be curious to know what it weighs.

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I also had the pleasure of meeting a guy in town who has a Mulicam. He was actually a customer at the machine shop where my parts were waiting, and noticed some similarities. Anyways, he left me his card with the guys who gave it to me, and I headed over to see his rig. It was very encouraging to see how similar my design is to the Mulicam. After a couple beers and CNC talk he was more then happy to let me take a couple pictures.

He let me take a couple images of his machine:

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Anyways, this makes my day to see how close my design came. Every time I see a machine I like my design changes a bit, but this time all it did was verify what I have been planning all along.

All in all a good day.


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