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mankku
Posted: April 15, 2008 10:22 am
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laugh.gif OK, whatever. No need to apologize. thumbsup.gif

Mankku
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brybliss
Posted: April 15, 2008 04:12 pm
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Ooops, it said NO REGULADA, not UNREGULADO (where did I get that?).

Next time, I'll practice not being lazy by checking out the links.


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kl27x
Posted: April 16, 2008 02:09 am
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I just joined the dark side. I bought a PICkit2. It's great. The software is very good, and it's almost identical to PICpgm, but with more options. I'm still wondering what the AUX line is for. But I'm sure I'll find out if I ever read the manual. So far, all I had to do was look up the pinout; the rest was intuitive.
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FunnyNYPD
Posted: April 24, 2008 03:35 am
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The aux pin on PICkit 2 is used for some enhanced functions, such as : programming EEPROM, logic analysis tool, serial port communication, I2C or SPI communication, etc.

So far, the most excited thing about PICkit 2 is the "Programmer-To-Go" feature, it basically program PICs without a PC.

Here is a tutorial on how to use "Programmer-To-Go" feature step by step.
http://www.auelectronics.com/UserManual-PI...grammerToGo.htm

Two you-tube videos has been post on my web site (System->BB0703, check on the bottom of the web page)

Regards,


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brybliss
Posted: August 12, 2008 02:11 pm
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I made a Serial type JDM programmer that works well, except for the LED part.

Serial Type JDM programmer

It worked, and still works, wonders for my thesis. thumbsup.gif


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Abdullah M.A.
Posted: August 12, 2008 07:04 pm
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"A scientist can discover a new star, but he cannot make one. He would have to ask an engineer to do that."
"For an optimist the glass is half full, for a pessimist it's half empty, and for an engineer is twice bigger than necessary."
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FunnyNYPD
Posted: November 21, 2008 05:39 pm
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BB0703+128K and BB0703+256K has the following Enhanced features to PICkit 2:
1. USB buck/boost circuits, guarantee internal +5V supply at all USB normal voltage inputs situation (4.1V to 5V normal), this will secure high quality programming voltage on PICKit2.
2. RJ12 Connector be compatible to ICD2/ICD3/RealICE.
3. dedicated external power supply circuit for Programmer-to-Go feature.
4. Native support 256K byte of Memory on "BB0703+256K", no hardware hack on PICkit2 is necessary.

For more info, please refer to:
http://www.auelectronics.com/System-PICkit2.htm
http://www.auelectronics.com/UserManual-BB0703.htm
user posted imageuser posted image
user posted image
user posted image

This post has been edited by FunnyNYPD on November 21, 2008 06:19 pm


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gramo
Posted: November 21, 2008 09:05 pm
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QUOTE (FunnyNYPD @ November 21, 2008 05:39 pm)
BB0703+128K and BB0703+256K

I see your really trying to push the PK2 clone there, my 2c - considering the legit PICKit 2 is $34.95 assembled, and also has the peace of mind its backed by Microchip (the guys that make PIC's)... Well it kinda doesn't matter what else you say from there.

You said that you get a valuable lesson with the DIY kit.. Soldering seems to be the only gain with your clone, you might however have the likely chance of fault finding your programmer when it doesn't work dry.gif I'd much prefer the reliability of a 'built by manufacture' backed with a warranty

All that aside, the legit PK2 casing is so much more suave then your bulky game cartridge contraption biggrin.gif

user posted image


You can get it here from Microchip, and all the relevant info such as supported devices (pretty much all PIC's) and the such can be found on the site too


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FunnyNYPD
Posted: November 22, 2008 05:54 am
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QUOTE
I'd much prefer the reliability of a 'built by manufacture' backed with a warranty

Well, I am assuming you are referring to the red-button ones. The black button ones (you posted) definitely need some hardware hack on the circuits, adding resistors to USB power and PGC/PGD circuits is a must to get it working reliably.

Now, even with red button ones, you still need hack the VPP pumping circuit on certain situation, check this out: Vpp pumping hack on Microchip PICKit2

To get the programmer to go, you need again hack the hardware as this procedure: Hardware hack for PTG (Microchip version of PICKit 2)

To get 256K EEPROM for PTG, please do the following hardware hack:
QUOTE
1 Open the PICkit 2 case by prying it apart with a small flat screwdriver at the three indentations
along the seam at a long edge of the case.
2 Remove the 24LC512 serial EEPROMs at reference designators U3 and U4 from the PCB.
3 Lift the A2 pins of two 24LC1025-I/SM serial EEPROMs so they do not contact the circuit
board pad when placed on the PCB.
4 Solder the two 24LC1025 EEPROMs in place at U3 and U4 on the PICkit 2 PCB.
5 Solder a wire from the lifted A2 pin to the VCC pin on both 24LC1025 EEPROMs.


If you still consider all of those a reliable design, you should vote the "BB0703+128K" and "BB0703+256K" a super reliable design, because they don't need any of these. Not even mention, the microchip design will definitely not working properly when USB power supply drops down to 4.6V, which happens all the time on laptops and USB hubs.

By the way, USB standard allows USB voltage changes from 4.1V to 5V to pass the certification. If you need a reliable system, please consider the "BB0703+128K" and "BB0703+256K" seriously.

This post has been edited by FunnyNYPD on November 22, 2008 06:03 am


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gramo
Posted: November 22, 2008 11:43 pm
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Yet to have any issues with the USB and I use the PK2 in situ regularly.

I'm actively against clones, not only because I have been bitten twice before by them, but I know personally that the PK2 is rock solid for its purpose. Not to mention your just pilfering sales that hinder development on the real deal - I guess its hand in hand with piracy.


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FunnyNYPD
Posted: December 09, 2008 03:54 am
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actually we are cooperating the Microchip PICkit 2 team when we were designing the BB0703+ products.

We took many inputs from the original designers who cannot do it by themselves because of other reasons. We cooperate each other because this will benefit the end user, which is our common goal.

There are some unique features on our BB0703 family design and it helps some people to overcome the inconvenience when using PTG and provides best programming quality at all situation.

The original PICKit2 will work most of the time, no doubt on that. However there are many "experts" keep attacking the original PICkit2 design for not considering the USB voltage variation enough and leave some potential holes if the device is used for production purpose. The BB0703+ is designed to overcome that potential issue for production usage purpose. Plus the "BB0703+256K" now naturally support 256K EEPROM for PTG feature which is not available anywhere else.

Basically, we don't directly compete with Microchip's PICKit2, we are the extension of their production line for customers who has special needs.

You are free to choose anything you like and express your thought/comments freely.

We have many BB0703 customers from Australia, please feel free to check out their reviews on the design and quality:
Customer Comments

QUOTE (gramo @ November 24, 2008 07:19 am)
I'm actively against clones

Agree. clone will hurt the original designer and it is not a way to respect the original designer.

The BB0703 and BB0703+ are not as simple as clone, even people call them clones. smile.gif

And PICkit2 are open-source projects (actually we are working to modify some of the source code with the help of original designers) since the day it was born: full schematic, full source code are all available to the public. once you go with the open-source license, you can modify any thing you want, from the hardware to the software, just pick what you need.

The BB0703 was designed around Aug-2007, and enhanced feature are included, such as dedicated power supply for PTG, RJ12 Connector (makes it easily to be compatible with ICD2/ICD2/RealICE), etc. All components are SMD. With 20% of more components, our design team has made a PCB even smaller than Microchip's design, that's quite a challenge. Not even mention, our team designed the hardware in a more conservative way, so no "VDD pumping" is necessary on certain situation which are required on the Microchip design.

The BB0703+ was designed couple of month ago, it has all the features of BB0703, plus a buck/boost circuit which can secure +5V power supply at any normal USB voltage inputs (from 4.1V to 5.5V). the BB0703+256K naturally support 256K of EEPROM for PTG. Again, all components are SMD package, and there are 40% more components (60% of more components footprints) than Microchip PICKit2, and the size is still smaller than Microchip's design. Mission impossible, isn't it?

Everything is possible.

Enjoy your PICkit2 or BB0703 (PICKit 2). And have a nice day.


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FunnyNYPD
Posted: May 15, 2009 01:46 am
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Here is a tutorial on understanding the PICkit 2 hardware:
http://augroups.blogspot.com/2009/05/under...ckit-2-rev.html
It covers some basic design concept on PICkit 2, such as USB voltage, Vpp Boost, Vdd detection and generation, PGD, PGC and Aux voltage clamping, etc.


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JepKneefRof
Posted: January 01, 2010 11:52 pm
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Ok, Ive been reading the problems that people have had, now I have my own problem to report.

I just received the PG2C programmer w/ PIC16F628 and it was working fine. I tried doing the ICSP and hooked the programmer up as was shown in the tutorial. The chip would not read/write with ICSP but the LED would light up showing activity. I swapped it back to the programmer, and it programmed fine. I swapped it back to try the ICSP again and same thing as before. However, this time, when I put the PIC back into the programmer, the LED does not light If I take the PIC out of the programmer, the light goes on when I do commands with IC-Prog even though there is no chip in it, so I am assuming there is a problem with either my chip or my programmer, but I dont have a multimeter to test it. I am sure that the chip is orriented correctly, but the programmers LED still does not light and nothing is written/read from the PIC. Where do you think the problem is and what can I do???

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kl27x
Posted: January 02, 2010 01:37 am
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QUOTE
I'd much prefer the reliability of a 'built by manufacture' backed with a warranty

Well, I am assuming you are referring to the red-button ones. The black button ones (you posted) definitely need some hardware hack on the circuits, adding resistors to USB power and PGC/PGD circuits is a must to get it working reliably.

Now, even with red button ones, you still need hack the VPP pumping circuit on certain situation, check this out: Vpp pumping hack on Microchip PICKit2

To get the programmer to go, you need again hack the hardware as this procedure: Hardware hack for PTG (Microchip version of PICKit 2)

To get 256K EEPROM for PTG, please do the following hardware hack:

None of that bothers me. The biggest problem I have with PICKit2 as a development programmer is the lack of clock/data line isolation when not programming. NYPD, are you listening? Add some solid state relays to your programmer, and that would be a real improvement. (Done that to mine, myself. All fits within the original case. Powered from the "busy light," which might mess up oscal autocalibration (which is always wrong, anyway) But maybe with your knowledge, you could come up with a better way?)

*hmm, just saw one of your other posts which suggests you have already addressed this issue! thumbsup.gif
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FunnyNYPD
Posted: January 08, 2010 04:23 am
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QUOTE
Add some solid state relays to your programmer, and that would be a real improvement. (Done that to mine, myself. All fits within the original case.

That's quite interesting, do you have a photo or schematic to show your improvement?


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kl27x
Posted: January 08, 2010 07:08 am
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Umm, yeah, there's one picture, I posted on a website
http://www.instructables.com/id/My_Top_Ten...ips_and_Tricks/

Scroll down to Step 7, and click on the fifth picture.

There's not a whole lot to see, which I haven't already described. The point of the mod is that even when you are using your PIC's PGC and PGD pins, you can leave the programmer connected to your dev board while you're developing or debugging your project, in most any scenario. Without that modification, those lines get loaded towards the ground rail when the programmer is inactive - enough to pull down the internal pullup, or to completely flatten an ADC input, for example.

The piezo transducer is a previous and separate addition. That was helpful when doing batch programming. But I've since switched to a homebrewed WinPic800 compatible programmer for that task. The guy who wrote WinPic800 went for all out speed, and he apparently knows what he's doing. PICKit2 software eats dust, in comparison.

Hmm. I also brought out the programming button input line to the ICSP header. I think that might be a good addition for your programmer. Because as it is, there doesn't appear to be a terribly big improvement compared to the official PICKit2, which comes fully assembled for only $35.00! Some additional creature comforts like these could really differentiate your product!
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2e0byo
Posted: April 07, 2013 09:46 pm
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Not sure if its been mentioned before, but if you prefer USB:

http://openprog.altervista.org/


I know very little of such things, but its more reliable than my parallel port lashup (featuring 4000 series logic and a surface mount HC1G07 open collector buffer for mclr. Not sure why really. But it worked sometimes.)

Circuit is very logical = throw together from junkbox.

Oh, and it claims to offer serial debugging and a dozen other things I've never heard of. And some Atmel chips.
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