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> New Idea For Smd Veroboard, SOIC or DIP parts. Whatcha think?
kl27x
Posted: January 19, 2012 02:18 am
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I hardly ever use protoboard, anymore. I have almost all SMD stuff and use CAD PCB design and toner transfer for even the simplest things. I don't even have a DIP resistor around, anywhere, other than a few power resistors. So I had an idea over a year ago to try an idea for SMD protoboard, but I never got around to doing it.

While I was designing a dev board, yesterday, I started to incorporate some SOIC prototyping areas, along with regular .1" spaced protoboarding areas. Then my old idea hit me again. Why mix SOIC spaced protoboard with regular? What does that achieve?

So the idea is instead of making .08" squares, spaced at 0.1" apart for the "DIP sections," I did the entire board with .038" squares, spaced at 0.05" apart. So it's perfectly spaced for SOIC parts. And if you want to do DIP parts or headers, you just center the pins in the middle, between 2-4 pads, and just bridge them together. And for fat, 0.15" spaced parts, you just bridge 3 rows together. If you wanted to drill a hole to connect to the bottom ground plane, you would just center the drill in the corner between 4 pads. Hmm.

I imagine a "production" version of this would be single sided and have holes predrilled, spaced 0.1" apart, centered between 4 pads. That way it's regular protoboard from one side, and can be used for SOIC parts on the other And if you wanted to score and snap this stuff it would be easy, cuz the pads would guide the scoring device in between the holes!

So I finally decided to test this theory. Here are a couple pics:

http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b103/kle...ICveroboard.jpg
http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b103/kle...Cveroboard3.jpg

Works good! In the pic is a DIP PIC and miscellaneous parts, which include an SOIC dual optocoupler and resistors of various sizes, a dual SOIC LED, a 0.1" spaced pin header, and a DIP LED. I also threw on a bigger SOT-something NPN to drive the LED, as well as a tiny SOT-23 PNP to drive the NPN. Not for any particular reason, just to see how they fit. The circuit works great.

The only issue I ran into is it's rather difficult to solder/slob a single row of squares together. The solution is to solder/slob 2 rows of pin together when you want to do it that way. Still takes up the same amount of board space as before, anyway.

And a picture of my cats. They're practicing synchronized chilling.
http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b103/kle...zedChilling.jpg
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AwesomeMatt
Posted: January 19, 2012 05:45 am
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Since most of my parts are salvaged, I've hardly done any SMD stuff. Looks awesome though.

Ya think if you're making your own boards anyway though, that it's actually any faster/more convenient to do this than to to make a proper board? To me, the idea of the blanks was to give a semi-universal board that was convenient to solder to, a circuit board for those that don't have the ability to make them.

Or, is that the point, that you could make these and sell them to people who don't make their own?
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kl27x
Posted: January 19, 2012 06:06 am
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QUOTE
To me, the idea of the blanks was to give a semi-universal board that was convenient to solder to, a circuit board for those that don't have the ability to make them.

Yeah, that's usually true. I mostly dig up a bit of board when I am altering or modding something I already made but forgot something. It just gives me something to tack parts and wires on, then hot glue to make the correction. But I also often use a blank piece of copper clad for that, and just engrave out some tracks.

But when making this dev board, I really didn't have a specific purpose in mind, so it needed to be more flexible.

I'm not really thinking of selling these things. Although I could have the fabbed in China for fairly cheap. I'm happy (and busy) with my current job. smile.gif

I was just more curious why they don't make boards like this to begin with, and how people would like it (or not like it) if they encountered it?
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Geek
Posted: January 19, 2012 11:33 am
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QUOTE (kl27x @ January 18, 2012 06:18 pm)
And a picture of my cats. They're practicing synchronized chilling.
http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b103/kle...zedChilling.jpg

thumbsup.gif thumbsup.gif

Very cool boards!


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tekwiz
Posted: January 19, 2012 09:53 pm
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Looks like an expansion of those SMT prototype boards you made for me, minus the IC pattern in the middle. Another winner.
Seems to me that things might gat a bit hairy with some of the chips with larger pin counts, however. Many of those are nearly impossible to access without using a double sided board with vias, even those with only 40 pins.
Then there are those new .85x.85mm multibump packages... wacko.gif


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kl27x
Posted: January 19, 2012 10:50 pm
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QUOTE
Seems to me that things might gat a bit hairy with some of the chips with larger pin counts, however. Many of those are nearly impossible to access without using a double sided board with vias, even those with only 40 pins.

Quite true. This is just for general prototyping areas on my specific QFP dev board. The dev board brings all the pins out to a single 0.1" spaced row of pads and has a custom oscillator pad and power/ground caps and layout. The "double density SOIC" prototyping areas are for adding your DIP/SOIC/SOT-xxx circuit glue or other non-standard headers to the mix. It's definitely not good enough to do 0.05" spaced QFP, unless specifically made for it. Like maybe if the lines came out in four different directions for the specific foot print. Even then it would be annoying, though. smile.gif

But I'm thinking this "double density" layout could feasibly replace 0.1" spaced protoboard, completely. Basically, wherever you need copper, you have it. It bridges together easily enough. And it solder sucks clean easy enough. And the vertical "vero-connections" are easy to score through with a carbide tipped pencil scribe or exacto knife. Even when doing strictly DIP, you have the option to break only half your trace, if you have to squeeze something in after the fact. Like if you're using a long double strip just to route a signal, then you need to fit another, just cut one of those 2 strips free. So it's theoretically better than regular veroboard in every way? I can't think of any obvious downsides.
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